0
Jump to main content

Explaining typical mistakes that Norwegian students make when they use English

Lenka Garshol at the Department of Foreign Languages and Translation at the Faculty of Humanities and Education has submitted her thesis entitled «I just doesn´t know. Agreement errors in English texts by Norwegian L2 learners: Causes and remedies» and will defend the thesis for the PhD-degree Monday 15 April 2019.

Based on the findings from the collected texts, I have developed a “flipped classroom” English grammar course which addresses a number of the typical errors that come up in students texts.

Lenka Garshol

PhD-Candidate and Assistant Professor

Lenka Garshol at the Department of Foreign Languages and Translation at the Faculty of Humanities and Education has submitted her thesis entitled «I just doesn´t know. Agreement errors in English texts by Norwegian L2 learners: Causes and remedies» and will defend the thesis for the PhD-degree Monday 15 April 2019.

She has followed the PhD-programme at the Faculty of Humanities and Education with Specialization in linguistics.

Summary of the thesis by Lenka Garshol:

I does this all the time

The dissertation focuses on identifying and explaining typical mistakes that Norwegian students make when they use English.

Norwegian students are atypical

In the linguistics part of the work, I have analysed agreement errors in English texts written by high school students.

It has emerged that English users whose first language is Norwegian have a tendency to use subject-verb agreement in an atypical manner in comparison to English users with other first languages.

Whilst most of those who learn English go through a period during which they drop agreement in the present, it appears as though the Norwegian students overproduce the “third person -s” in subject-verb combinations where it should not be present.

Since Norwegian conjugations can, on the surface, resemble English agreement, first language influence could well be the reason for this kind of atypical development.

Development of digital grammar teaching

Based on the findings from the collected texts, I have developed a “flipped classroom” English grammar course which addresses a number of the typical errors that come up in students texts.

Flipped classroom as a didactic method moves white or blackboard teaching to the home via a short video with accompanying exercises in order to free up classroom time for more student-centred teaching.

The course will be available for all interested teachers and students on the Campus Inkrement-platform.

Disputation facts:

The Candidate: Lenka Garshol (1984) BA in english language and litterature (2008) from Masaryk University, Brno, Tsjekkia, Masters degree in english (2013) from UiA with the Master thesis «The acquisition of verb movement in first language acquisition: Comparison of English and Norwegian». Today she is working as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Foreign Languages and Translation at the Faculty of Humanities and Education, UiA.

The trial lecture and the public defence will take place at Gabriel Scotts auditorium – B1-001, Campus Kristiansand.

Dean Sunniva Whittaker will chair the disputation. 

Trial lecture at 10:30 a.m.

Public defense at 12:30 p.m.

Given topic for trial lecture:  “When do "errors" reflect grammar?”

Thesis title: «I just doesn´t know. Agreement errors in English texts by Norwegian L2 learners: Causes and remedies»

Search for the thesis in AURA - Agder University Research Archive, a digital archive of scientific papers, theses and dissertations from the academic staff and students at the University of Agder. The thesis will also be available at the University Library, and some copies will also be available for loan at the auditorium where the disputation takes place.

Opponents:

First opponent: Professor Tom Roeper, University of Massachusetts

Second opponent: Associate Professor Anne Dahl, NTNU

Associate Professor Ingrid Kristine Hasund, UiA is appointed as the administrator for the assessment commitee.

Supervisors were Professor Dagmar Haumann, University in Bergen (main supervisor) and Professor Barbara Gawronska, UiA (co-supervisor)

Share study by email