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Digital Twin technology toward more sustainable buildings

Heidar Hosamo (foto)

In essence, my research is about harmonizing the relationship between buildings and their occupants. By embracing the power of digital technology, we can create structures that are not only more sustainable but also more in tune with the needs and comforts of those who use them.

Haidar Hosamo

PhD Candidate

Haidar Hosamo will defend his PhD thesis Digital Twin technology toward more sustainable buildings 30 November 2023.

Summary of the thesis

Imagine a world where buildings could "talk" to us, telling us how they feel, how they are performing, and what they need to be more efficient and comfortable for their inhabitants. This is not a plot from a sci-fi movie but the essence of my recent research at the University of Agder.

At the heart of this research is the concept of a "Digital Twin" - a virtual replica of a physical building. Think of it as a bridge between the bricks-and-mortar world and the digital universe. This twin is not just a static model; it is dynamic, constantly receiving and analyzing data from sensors placed throughout the building. This allows us to monitor and optimize various aspects of a building, from energy consumption to the comfort of its occupants.

One of the primary goals of my research was to make buildings more sustainable. Buildings, especially non-residential ones, consume a significant amount of energy. By integrating digital technologies, we can monitor and manage this consumption better, leading to more energy-efficient and environmentally friendly structures.

But it is not just about energy. Comfort is a significant aspect too. Through my research, I explored how we can enhance the well-being of a building's occupants. By understanding and analyzing data, we can ensure that the indoor environment of a building - its temperature, air quality, and more - is always at its optimal level for those inside.

Furthermore, my work investigates the predictive maintenance of buildings. Instead of waiting for something to break down, the Digital Twin can forecast potential issues, allowing us to address them proactively. This not only saves time and money but also ensures that buildings always remain functional and comfortable.

In essence, my research is about harmonizing the relationship between buildings and their occupants. By embracing the power of digital technology, we can create structures that are not only more sustainable but also more in tune with the needs and comforts of those who use them.

In a rapidly changing world, where sustainability and well-being are paramount, the potential of Digital Twins offers a promising path forward. It is a journey I am excited to be a part of, and I believe it holds the key to a brighter, greener, and more comfortable future for all.

More about time and place for the doctoral defense.