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Student wins competition with video about future health technology

UiA student Kathrine Holteberg (23) recently won the student competition of the Girls and Technology project. In a self-made video she tells how she wants to improve world health through technology.

Technology student Kathrine Holteberg (23) from Farsund is passionate about her profession. She recently won the student competition of the national Girls and Technology project.
Technology student Kathrine Holteberg (23) from Farsund is passionate about her profession. She recently won the student competition of the national Girls and Technology project.

“I was incredibly happy when I won because I am really passionate about technology. I look forward to continue sharing the experience.”

That is what Kathrine Holteberg says, who is a master’s student in industrial economics and technology management at the University of Agder.

Holteberg recently won the student competition of the national project Girls and Technology. The winner of the competition wins a trip to Svalbard, with activities and programme focusing on technology.

The student competition challenged participants to address a societal problem. This year’s challenge was the following:

“Health is so many things, and there are so many things that affect our health. You are the leader of a company that develops technology that will help improve world health. What will you focus on and why?”

We want more girls in technology 

As the winner of the competition, Kathrine Holteberg will be involved in organising adventure days for girls at lower and upper secondary school level in Agder. The purpose is to show the possibilities that exist within science and technology.

Kathrine Holteberg tar master industriell økonomi og teknologiledelse, og har en bachelorgrad i mekatronikk. I tillegg er hun sertifisert IWE-sveiseingeniør.

Kathrine Holteberg is taking a master's degree in industrial economics and technology management and has a bachelor's degree in mechatronics. In addition, she is a certified International Welding Engineer (IWE).

“You don’t necessarily have to like engines, electronics or machines to study technology. Therefore, it is important that girls get female role models who can show the opportunities that exist in the tech industry”, she says.

The 23-year-old took a bachelor's degree in mechatronics and the coveted International Welding Engineer certification at UiA. Previously she worked as a temp in the process industry with aluminium production at Alcoa Lista. During holidays, Holteberg works as a mechatronics engineer for the metal manufacturer Eramet Kvinesdal.

UiA inspires

Holteberg describes the University of Agder as an inspiring place to study technology. Here she found the inspiration to dream of becoming a leader who promotes the industry of the future to women.

Holteberg ønsker å inspirere flere jenter og kvinner til å velge teknologutdanning.

Holteberg wants to inspire more girls and women to choose technology careers.

“My studies have provided good insight into complex issues. I have enjoyed myself very much throughout my studies, but I see the importance of recruiting more girls into engineering. A diversity of backgrounds and professional experiences will bring a positive contribution to the labour market”, she says.

FACT BOX: The Girls and Technology project

  • Girls and Technology is a project started by the University of Agder in 2003.
  • In 2016, NHO (the Confederation of Norwegian Enterprise) started a national project to increase the share of women in technical fields in vocational secondary schools, vocational colleges and higher education.
  • To ensure that companies recruit the broadest and best talent, NHO, NITO and the National Centre for Science Recruitment work to attract more girls into technology studies.

Source: jenterogteknologi.com