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Time

22. Feb
kl 10:15 - 18:00

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Place

Rom C2 040, Campus Grimstad

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No deadline specified

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Disputation: Rune Husveg on treatment of produced water in the oil industry

Time

22 Feb
kl 10:15 - 18:00

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Place

Rom C2 040, Campus Grimstad

Registration deadline

No deadline specified

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Rune Husveg  is defending his PhD-thesis “Tracking Maximum Produced Water Treatment Efficiency Using a Variable Speed Coalescing Centrifugal Pump” Friday 22 February 2019. Husveg is an industrial PhD, funded by the Research Council of Norway and Typhonix AS, through the Industrial Ph.D. Scheme. (Photo: Private)

Rune Husveg  is defending his PhD-thesis “Tracking Maximum Produced Water Treatment Efficiency Using a Variable Speed Coalescing Centrifugal Pump” Friday 22 February 2019. Husveg is an industrial PhD, funded by the Research Council of Norway and Typhonix AS, through the Industrial Ph.D. Scheme. (Photo: Private)

Rune Husveg at the University of Agders Faculty for Engineering and Science has submitted his thesis entitled “Tracking Maximum Produced Water Treatment Efficiency Using a Variable Speed Coalescing Centrifugal Pump”, and will defend the thesis for the PhD-degree Friday 22 February 2019.

He has followed the PhD-programme at the Faculty for Engineering and Science, with specialisation in Mechatronics.

Rune Husveg is an Industrial PhD.

Summary of the thesis by Rune Husveg

Tracking maximum water treatment efficiency

Produced water https://www.americangeosciences.org/critical-issues/faq/what-produced-water is the most significant by-product of petroleum production, and it is often associated with large volumes and high handling costs. Even though naturally occurring, the produced water poses substantial environmental impacts if not managed correctly.

Today, the portion of produced water increases as fields are kept in operation for extended periods of time.

Minimize environmentally harmful substances

A holistic perspective is therefore required to minimize the content of dispersed oil and other environmentally harmful substances in the discharged water, to reach the zero harmful discharge goal.

Oil removal is the primary goal of produced water treatment, and the efficiency of the treatment equipment is highly sensitive to the oil droplet's size.

Generally, the larger the droplets, the better the separation. Therefore, a coalescing centrifugal pump has been introduced to target produced water applications. This pump promotes droplet growth rather than breakage and thereby increases the separation efficiency.

In the work of this thesis, tracking techniques have been designed, using real-time process information to adjust the operation of the novel coalescing pump continuously, to optimize the droplet growth and maximize oil removal efficiency.

Thesis: More efficient equipment

For oil companies, the techniques developed in this thesis can be used to utilize existing process equipment and installations better, and to make new facilities more compact and efficient.

The strategies can also be considered a step in reducing the total discharge of harmful substances, and to reduce emissions and the use of chemicals related to produced water treatment.

The results of this work are hence a unique and novel utilization of emerging pump technology, and a step closer to reaching the zero harmful discharge goal.

Disputation facts:

The trial lecture and the public defence will take place at Room C2 040, Campus Grimstad, Friday 22 February 2019.

Professor Henrik Kofoed NielsenDepartment of Engineering Sciences, will chair the disputation.

Trial lecture at 10:15 a.m.

Dissertation at 12:15 p.m.

Given topic for trial lecture: “Beyond the hydrocyclone: novel and state-of-the-art separation concepts”

Thesis title: “Tracking Maximum Produced Water Treatment Efficiency Using a Variable Speed Coalescing Centrifugal Pump”

Search for the thesis in AURA - Agder University Research Archive, a digital archive of scientific papers, theses and dissertations from the academic staff and students at the University of Agder. The thesis will also be available at the University Library, and some copies will also be available for loan at the auditorium where the dissertation takes place.

Opponents:

First opponent: Associate Professor Zhenyu Yang, Department of Energy Technology, Esbjerg, Aalborg University

Second opponent: Associate Professor Christian HoldenDepartment of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, NTNU

Professor Kjetil Magne Dørheim HalsDepartment of Engineering Sciences, UiA is appointed as the administrator for the assessment commitee.

Supervisors were Professor Michael Rygaard Hansen  (main supervisor), Assistant Professor Morten Ottestad, UiA, Niels van Teeffelen  (external) and Trygve Husveg (external) (supervisors)

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