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Tidspunkt

9. juni - 11. juni 2021
kl 10:15 - 17:00

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Sted

Online - more info after registration

Påmeldingsfrist

1 mai

PhD Course FIL601 – The Philosophy of Art

Campus Kristiansand, UiA, foto

Campus Kristiansand, UiA. Foto: Olav Breen.

Tidspunkt

9 juni - 11 juni
kl 10:15 - 17:00

Legg til kalender

Sted

Online - more info after registration

Påmeldingsfrist

1 mai

In this course, we read, study and discuss a classical work in the philosophy of art: Aristotle’s Poetics. Over the span of three days, we look into his ideas about what poetry is, what characterizes the different poetic genres and, in particular, how one writes a successful tragedy.

Instructors: Associate Professor Hilde Vinje and Professor Einar Duenger Bøhn

E-mail: hilde.vinje@uia.no and einar.d.bohn@uia.no

 

Schedule

Wednesday 9th June, 2021

10:15 - 12:00: Introduction to Aristotle’s Poetics

12:00 - 13:00: Lunch

13:15 - 15:00: The notion of mimesis

15:15 - 17:00: The definition of tragedy

Thursday 10th June, 2021:

10:15 - 12:00: The notion of catharsis

12:00 - 13:00: Lunch

13:15 - 15:00: The ideal plot and tragic failure

15:15 - 17:00: Tragic vs. epic poetry

Friday 11th June, 2021:

10:15 - 12:00: Aristotle and Greek tragedies

12:00 - 13:00: Lunch

13:15-15:00: How to use the Poetics in practice

15:15-17:00: Discussion and closing remarks 

Readings:

Ancient literature

Numerous translations of the ancient works are available in English (and some in Norwegian). The following translations are our recommendations in English:

Aristotle 1995, The Poetics, Halliwell, S. (ed. and trans.), The Loeb Classical Library, Harvard University Press, Cambridge/London. Available online through the University Library.

Sophocles 1994a, Oedipus Tyrannus, Lloyd-Jones, H. (ed. and trans.), The Loeb Classical Library, Harvard University Press, Cambridge/London. Available online through the University Library.

­––––––. 1994b, Antigone, Lloyd-Jones, H. (ed. and trans.), The Loeb Classical Library, Harvard University Press, Cambridge/London. Available online through the University Library. [optional]

Modern literature

Belfiore, E.S. 1992, ‘Tragic Katharsis’, in Belfiore, E.S., Tragic Pleasures: Aristotle on Plot and Emotion, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, pp. 337–360. Available online through the University Library.

Booth, W. 1992, ‘The Poetics for a Practical Critic’, in Rorty, A.O. (ed.), Aristotle’s Poetics, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, pp. 387–408.

Halliwell, S. 1986a, ‘Mimesis’, in Halliwell, S., Aristotle’s Poetics, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, pp. 109–137.

––––––. 1986b, ‘Appendix 5: Interpretations of katharsis, in Halliwell, S., Aristotle’s Poetics, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, pp. 350–356. [optional]

Heath, M. 2013, ‘The natural history of poetry: Aristotle’, in Heath, M. Ancient Philosophical Poetics, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 56–103. [optional]

Kim, H. 2010, ‘Aristotle’s Hamartia Reconsidered’, in Harvard Studies of Classical Philology, Vol. 105, pp. 33–52. Available online [optional]

Sherman, N. 1992, ‘Hamartia and Virtue’, in Rorty, A.O. (ed.), Aristotle’s Poetics, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, pp. 177–196.

White, S. 1992, ‘Aristotle’s Favorite Tragedies’, in Rorty, A.O. (ed.), Aristotle’s Poetics, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, pp. 221–240.

FIL601 - The philosophy of art

Programme

PhD-programme at the Faculty of Humanities and Education, specialization in Religion, Ethics, History and Society

Prerequisites

Students must be admitted to a relevant PhD-programme

Recommended previous knowledge

A course in philosophy or aesthetics

Learning outcomes

After taking this course, the candidate will have an understanding of and ability to independently discuss and communicate on the topic of what art is, as well as philosophical issues surrounding 

the writing and interpretation of poetry.

Contents

In this course, we read, study and discuss a classical work in the philosophy of art: Aristotle’s Poetics. Over the span of three days, we look into his ideas about what poetry is, what characterizes the different poetic genres and, in particular, how one writes a successful tragedy.

On the first day, the main focus is Aristotle’s idea that poetry is imitation. What is poetic imitation? Aristotle certainly means something more general by ‘poetic’ than what we do today, but what does he mean more exactly? What does he mean by ‘imitation’? What does it tell us about the value of poetry? Furthermore, we examine how the various genres of poetry differ from each other and look closer into the definition of tragedy.

The second day builds on the previous discussion of the definition of tragedy and we look further into the details of Aristotle’s account of tragic poetry. What makes a tragedy successful? How should we understand the famous notion of catharsis? What happens in the best tragedies? What is the value of a tragedy?

On the third day, we proceed to discuss the relationship between theory and practice. How does Aristotle’s theory relate to actual works in Greek literature? In particular, we look at two famous plays by Sophocles, from the fall of the house of Oedipus. Further, how can Aristotle’s Poetics be used to write or criticize plays and other poetic creations today?

Teaching methods

Discussion-based lectures

Examination requirement

Participation in the discussion-based lectures

Assessment methods and criteria

A paper on one of the problems discussed in the lectures, grounded in the things read for the course. The paper should be roughly 15 pages long (12p, 1,5s, Times New Roman).

Offered as a free-standing course

Yes

Credit Points

5

Responsible faculty

Faculty for Humanities and Education

Contact persons

Einar Duenger Bøhn: e-mail: einar.d.bohn@uia.no

Hilde Vinje: e-mail: hilde.vinje@uia.no

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